The Dog Ate My Homework PBL

Tuesday 11/22/11
Common PBL Agenda.pdf
Note: This problem will be completed in class all in one day. Ignore the comments on some of the handouts that refer to next class.
Homework_Picture
PART I
Read Part I of the problem & the Washington Post Article without talking. Individually record your thoughts on:
  • What was your most vivid homework memory?
  • Do you agree or disagree with the author's opinions? Why or why not?
After each person has had a chance to record own opinion, discuss with members of your group. Share as a whole class.

Part I of the Problem
Part 1-PBL Dog Ate My Homework.pdf
Washington Post Article
Washington Post Article.pdf

PART II
  • Assign group roles (2 parents & 2-3 teachers) - take on this role throughout your work on the problem.
  • Read Part 2 and work on your Personal Refection Log (handout) independently. 15 minutes
  • Take turns reading the problem aloud to your group.
  • Groups discuss comments noted in their personal reflection logs & complete the Group Worksheet (handout) - you will complete this form in the role of members of the Daniels Elementary School staff or parents of students at the school and complete the task assigned by Principal Essex.
Part 2-The Dog Ate My Homework.pdf
PersonalReflectionLog
GroupWorksheet

Sample Homework Policy Statements

http://school.esdnl.ca/schools/stgeorgeselementary/homepol.htm
http://math.arizona.edu/~laetsch/124054/HomeworkPolicy.html
http://www.gusd.k12.ca.us/cms/page_view?d=x&piid=&vpid=1231766302559

Group Reading Resources

Type notes for your selected article(s) and post to your group's project page.

Cooper, H. (2001). Homework for all in moderation. Educational Leadership, 58(7), 34-38.
CooperHomeworkForAll.pdf

Cooper, H. (2007). The battle over homework: Common ground for administrators,
teachers, and parents (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. (preview sample)
http://books.google.com/books?id=2IWOfwU96jQC&pg=PA90&lpg=PA90&dq=homework+policy+statements&source=bl&ots=5hW3VJ8ntC&sig=Hj6u9fUC2t98PHK4mnPDj5Lu-0I&hl=en&ei=mzbJTs3OMM7Mtgeb-Z3aCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CFkQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=homework%20policy%20statements&f=false

Homework [Special issue, 2004]. Theory Into Practice, 43(3).
Selected Articles:
HomeworkHotlinesRecommendations
MeaningsofHomeworkImplicationsforPractice
MotivationalBenefitsofHomework
ReflectingontheHomeworkRitual
HomeworkastheJobofChildhood

Margolis, H. (2005). Resolving struggling learners homework difficulties: Working with elementary school learners and parents. Preventing School Failure, 50(1), 5-12.
ResolvingStrugglingLearnersHomeworkDifficulties.pdf

Marzano, R.J., & Pickering, D.J. (2007). Errors and allegations about research on homework. Phi Delta Kappan, 88(7), 507-513.
MarzanoErrorsandAllegations.pdf

Marzano, R., & Pickering, D.J. (2007). The case for and against homework. Educational Leadership, 64(6), 74-79.
MarzanoTheCaseforandAgainstHomework.pdf

National PTA (n.d.). Help your student get the most out of homework.
www.pta.org/2044.htm

The Center for Public Education. What Research says about the value of homework.
http://www.centerforpubliceducation.org/Main-Menu/Instruction/What-research-says-about-the-value-of-homework-At-a-glance/default.aspx